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Mobile Advertising Explained

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Mobile advertising is still a very new industry, with plenty of opportunities. You’ve probably heard stories of how the people who first got in the door of SEO or AdWords made a lot of money in “the good old days.”

Today, mobile advertising looks a lot like the search space did when it was in its infancy.

The industry is highly, highly fragmented. There is no dominant leader in the mobile advertising space. Each ad platform has slightly different guidelines and requirements.

That means that there are very few big advertisers driving up competing ad prices. Very few people are starting new ad campaigns, because few people truly understand how mobile advertising works yet.

==> Understanding the Different Types of Networks

There are a few different kinds of networks you can advertise on.

First, you have networks that take regular ad space and put mobile ads there. Many advertisers choose specifically to exclude mobile traffic, so ad networks have to sell mobile ads separately.

Next you have networks that sell ads through mobile applications.

There are two different kinds of networks: blind networks and premium networks.

Blind networks generally have a lot of different places that they put their ads, none of them with too much traffic individually, but it adds up when taken in combination.

Instead of bidding on placements, you bid on demographic, generic interests, countries, etc.

On the other hand, you have premium networks, which allow you to target specific high traffic apps or websites. Going premium lets you know exactly where your ads will show up, but you usually have to pay more.

==> Understanding the Mobile Mindset

Marketing to mobile users is different than marketing to internet users.

First of all, mobile users are usually short on time. While someone might sit on their computer for hours at a time, people are usually on their mobile phones for no more than 15 minutes.

Users also tend to have a more personal relationship with their phones. It’s something that’s with them at all times.

As a result, when you’re advertising, it usually makes sense to try to start a relationship with the user, rather than get them to buy anything.

Try to get them to install an app. Try to get push notification privileges. Try to get SMS permission. Try to get a Facebook like. Try to get them on Twitter.

Get them into a relationship. Then and only then should you start to market to them, slowly. Mobile users will rarely buy on the spot, but often would be willing to buy if you start a relationship with them first.

Mobile advertising is about understanding your market and then finding an ad network that will allow you to reach them. You might have to test several different networks before you find one that works for your market.